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Human Milk in the NICU: Policy into Practice

Author(s): Lois D.W Arnold, PhD, MPH, CLC
Details:
  • ISBN-13: 9780763761332
  • Paperback    490 pages      © 2010
Price: $117.95 US List
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This unique text covers the use of banked, or stored, human milk in the hospital for premature and sick infants, and discusses the advantages of human milk feedings and the elements of hazard or risk introduced by the use of formulas, including rationales for the use of both mother’s own milk and donor human milk in the NICU.

This reference also highlights domestic health policies that impact the use of human milk for sick and fragile infants, international models and policies for milk banking, the history of donor milk banking and how it came into being and ethical issues surrounding the delivery of milk banking services and donor human milk in the NICU.

Features Include:
*Case histories highlighting key concepts
*Tables and boxed algorithms for a brief overview of the information
*Glossary
 

Part I  Introduction
  Chapter 1  Introduction
Part II  Establishing the Need for Human Milk
  Chapter 2  Establishing the need for human milk in the NICU
Part III  The Baby-Friendly NICU: The Ten Steps for Providing Maternal Milk
  Chapter 3  Step 1: Developing a policy supportive of breastfeeding/human milk use
  Chapter 4  Step 2: Training all health care staff in skills to implement the policy
  Chapter 5  Step 3: Teach mothers about the benefits of human milk for their preterm infants
  Chapter 6  Step 4: Initiate early skin-to-skin as soon as possible
  Chapter 7  Step 5: Help mothers to begin early milk expression, and provide education and support for establishing and maintaining an adequate milk supply
  Chapter 8  Step 6: Give special care infants only human milk unless medically contraindicated
  Chapter 9  Step 7: Promote skin-to-skin contact between parents and their preterm infants
  Chapter 10  Step 8: Foster early transition to full breastfeeding
  Chapter 11  Step 9: Use ethical evidence-based breastfeeding practices free of conflicts of interest
  Chapter 12  Step 10: Foster the establishment of breastfeeding support groups and community programs and refer mothers to them.
Part IV  Use of Banked Donor Human Milk as an Alternative
  Chapter 13  Clinical use of donor milk
  Chapter 14  Brief history of donor milk banking in the US
  Chapter 15  International models
  Chapter 16  The Ten Steps for a “Baby-Friendly” milk bank
Part V  Conclusions
  Chapter 17  Conclusions

Lois D.W Arnold, PhD, MPH, CLC