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Infection Control in Ambulatory Care

Author(s): Candace Friedman, MPH, CIC, University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, Michigan
Kathleen H. Petersen, MS, CIC, University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, Michigan
Details:
  • ISBN-13: 9780763731908
  • ISBN-10:0763731900
  • Paperback    309 pages      © 2004
Price: $210.95 US List
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An increasing number of patients with a variety of illnesses are cared for in the ambulatory setting. In addition, many diagnostic and treatment modalities, including invasive and surgical procedures, are now performed in ambulatory settings. The combination of immunocompromised patients and complexity of care in ambulatory settings results in a need for focus on prevention of infection.

 

This book assists all professionals who practice infection prevention and control and healthcare epidemiology in ambulatory settings in formulating a planned, organized approach to infection control in compliance with JCAHO requirements. It provides background information on infection control in ambulatory care, an overview of the basic principles and methods of infection control, and describes recommended practices for various ambulatory care settings. A chapter on bioterrorism reviews the various agents and issues such as early recognition, isolation precautions, disinfection/sterilization, occupational health, and education.

 

With this unique, comprehensive book you can plan, organize, and apply an effective infection control program in your ambulatory care facility!

 

An official Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) publication.

Features & Benefits

A chapter on bioterrorism reviews the various agents and issues such as early recognition, isolation precautions, disinfection/sterilization, occupational health, and education.

Authors have collected their information from a variety of sources for this complete reference.

Chapter One:  Infection Control and Ambulatory Care
Chapter Two:  The Infectious Disease Process (Contributing Author: Carol E. Chenoweth)
Chapter Three:  Cleaning, Disinfecting and Sterilizing Patient Care Equipment
Chapter Four:  Personal Protective Equipment
Chapter Five:  Hand Hygiene
Chapter Six:  Isolation Precautions
Chapter Seven:  Physician Offices and Clinics
Chapter Eight:  Ambulatory Surgery
Chapter Nine:  Endoscopy
Chapter Ten:  Infusion Therapy
Chapter Eleven:  Invasive Cardiology
Chapter Twelve:  Dentistry
Chapter Thirteen:  Dialysis
Chapter Fourteen:  Ophthalmology/Optometry
Chapter Fifteen:  Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Chapter Sixteen:  Radiology
Chapter Seventeen:  Urgent/Emergency Care Centers
Chapter Eighteen:  Laboratory Practices
Chapter Nineteen:  Occupational Health
Chapter Twenty:  Data Management
Chapter Twenty-one:  Outbreak Investigations
Chapter Twenty-two:  Public Health, Accrediting & Regulatory Agencies
Chapter Twenty-three:  Bioterrorism
Chapter Twenty-four:  Organizing for Infection Prevention Surveillance and Control

Appendices

A. Requirements for Infrastructure and Essential Activities of Infection Control and Epidemiology in Out-of-Hospital Settings
B. Infection Control Program
C. Triage Screening Tools
D. Isolation Tools
E. Education Tools
F. Disinfection/Sterilization Tools
G. Surveillance Tools
H. Outbreak Investigation Tools
I. Exposure Control Plan
J. Occupational Health Tools
K. Bioterrorism Tools


Candace Friedman, MPH, CIC-University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, Michigan

Candace Friedman, MPH, CIC,
Manager, Infection Control & Epidemiology
University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers
University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI

Kathleen H. Petersen, MS, CIC
Staff Specialist, Infection Control & Epidemiology
University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers
University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI

Kathleen H. Petersen, MS, CIC-University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers, Michigan

  • "Designed to help organizations meet JCAHO accreditation standards, the resource is ideal for practicing health care workers and libraries supporting all types of health care centers. Academic libraries supporting programs in epidemiology and the healthcare professions will also find this a valuable addition to their collections."

    -- Lisa C. Wallis, Senior Assistant Librarian/Life and Health Sciences Liaison, San Francisco State University J. Paul Leonard Library